A place to see good, share good, and do good.

Refresh Not-LiftedLIFT 2 Lifted

[Graph of views over time] 4 Viewed

FollowUn-Follow this Planet Spotlight  

Show on your Nest:



Flag as Spam or Fraud

The Buzz

This Planet Spotlight was created on Jun 23, 2015 @ 03:13:00 pm

See all Buzz

StandPart with One World Blue, LLC to connect and show activity on your Nest

Show on your Nest when One World Blue, LLC:








What's this?The list of who you connected to, and who connected with you, is normally public. This can help you and others find like minded or interesting people to connect with. But if necessary you can hide this connection, and it will not be visible to anyone, not even the person you are connecting to.

 

Comments

No Comments yet

Login or create an account and you can comment too!

Stand & Unite

Your Nest   Refresh

Login or create an account and you can create your own personal Nest!

Browse Planet Sanctuary Spotlights

Natural wonders Iguassu Falls

Iguassu Falls.jpg

Source:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iguazu_Falls

Iguazu Falls are located where the Iguazu River tumbles over the edge of the Paraná Plateau, 23 kilometres (14 mi) upriver from the Iguazu's confluence with the Paraná River.[1] Numerous islands along the 2.7-kilometre-long (1.7 mi) edge divide the falls into many separate waterfalls and cataracts, varying between 60 to 82 metres (197 to 269 ft) high. The number of these smaller waterfalls fluctuates from 150 to 300, depending on the water level. Approximately half of the river's flow falls into a long and narrow chasm called the Devil's Throat (Garganta del Diablo in Spanish or Garganta do Diabo in Portuguese. The Devil's Throat is U-shaped, 82 metres high, 150 m wide, and 700 m long (269×492×2,297 ft). Placenames have been given also to many other smaller falls, such as San Martín Falls, Bossetti Falls, and many others.

Iguazú Falls from the Argentine side
About 900 metres (2,950 ft) of the 2.7-kilometre (1.7 mi) length does not have water flowing over it. The edge of the basalt cap recedes by 3 mm (0.1 in) per year. The water of the lower Iguazu collects in a canyon that drains into the Paraná River, a short distance downstream from the Itaipu Dam. The junction of the water flows marks the border between Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay. There are points in the cities of Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil, Puerto Iguazú, Argentina, and Ciudad del Este, Paraguay, which have access to the Iguazu River, where the borders of all three nations may be seen, a popular tourist attraction for visitors to the three cities.

Accounts
Manage Account Privacy Policy Terms of Use Join Sales Team
Contact
Feedback Report a Problem Contact Us About Us
One World Blue Network
Initiatives Light on the World Planet Sanctuary Light of Culture Stand & Unite List Initiatives List World Spotlights List Planet Spotlights List Culture Spotlights
Universality
Universal Human Rights Peace in the World Social Network for
Social Change
   
           

© 2014-2018 One World Blue, LLC ®